Reveling and Revealing at the Mardi Gras Mask Market

When it comes to Mardi Gras in New Orleans, you think of parades, Bourbon Street, beads and music. But you should also think masks because wearing masks on Mardi Gras and during the two weeks of Carnival that led up to the big day, is part of the tradition.  And part of the fun.

 

The Mardi Gras Mask Market featured the work of 15 mask artists and drew droves of collecctors and shoppers.
The Mardi Gras Mask Market featured the work of 15 mask artists and drew droves of collectors and shoppers.

For the past 33 years prior to Mardi Gras, mask makers from around the country have been bringing their handcrafted masks to the French Market Mask Market. It’s one of the highlights of the celebration and if you’re lucky enough to be in New Orleans of that weekend, as I was this year, it’s something you don’t want to miss.  Tucked in Dutch Alley, the market opens on Friday before Mardi Gras and continues through Monday.  During that time, Mardi Gras revelers and tourists can come to pick out a mask to wear or take home from a variety of mask makers who offer a their creations in a variety of styles.  Prices range anywhere from $15, for assemble-it-yourself kits, up to $200 or more for some of the more elaborate masks.

The cat mask shown here by his assistant, was Richard Thompson's new design at this year's Mardi Gras Mask Market.
The cat mask shown here by his assistant, was Richard Thompson’s new design at this year’s Mardi Gras Mask Market.

It’s a big weekend for the mask makers too, some of whom, like Richard Thompson of Finger Lakes, N.Y.  have been coming to this annual event 20 years or more.  This year’s mask market drew 15 different mask makers and hundreds of shoppers, some of whom, like Carrie of The Party Never Ends, from Washington D.C. came in costume. Carrie stopped at the booth of mask maker Wendy Drolma from Woodstock, N.Y. to pick out a mask.  “I have masks for all sorts of different occasions,” Carrie explained. After trying on several of Drolma’s leather masks, she settled on one with reddish tones.

Wendy Drolma greets collectors to her mask booth at the Mardi Gras Mask Market.
Wendy Drolma greets collectors to her mask booth at the Mardi Gras Mask Market.

Drolma is a self-taught mask maker of 25 years who began her craft at age 25. At the time, she had a corporate job but was looking for something else to do. “I like to say that mask making found me,” she explains.  And though others may refer to her as a mask maker, she likes to think of herself as an ‘alchemist’, whose masks transforms those who place one of her creations on their face. “I want my masks to say something about me,” she says.

Veronica Ur stands alongside some of her husband, Vincent Ur's, masks available for purchase during the Mardi Gras Mask Market.
Veronica Ur stands alongside some of her husband, Vincent Ur’s, masks available for purchase during the Mardi Gras Mask Market.

Vincent Ur is also a self-taught. His fascination with mask making in his 20s after he and his wife, Valerie, fist visited New Orleans. Valerie loved the masks she saw there and the two of them wandered in and out of the many shops that sell masks in the French Quarter.  When Vincent when home, he began experimenting and launched a new career for himself, one that has been very rewarding. In addition to selling masks on his website, Masks on Parade, Vincent takes special orders and recently completed masks for the Houston Opera’s production of ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ But he still comes to the Mardi Gras Mask Market as he done for the past 23 years.

Diane Trapp with some of ther masks shown at the 2016 Mask Market in New Orleans.
Diane Trapp with some of their masks shown at the 2016 Mask Market in New Orleans.

Diane Trapp’s masks have also appeared in many stage productions, as well as episodes of the CW television series, ‘Vampire Diaries’ and in pre-show events for Lady Gaga concerts. Trapp and her sister-in-law, Connie, live in Hillsboro, Ore. where the two have been happily creating masks for the Mask Market for the past 23 years. They even were there the year after Katrina hit, as was I. That year, I purchased one of Diane’s spectacular masks, which I still own and wear for special events. It never fails to bring in ‘awes’ from friends along with questions as to where I bought it. The two women each have their own style.

Colorful strands of yarn are decorate the masks of Connie Trapp.
Colorful strands of yarn are decorate the masks of Connie Trapp.

Connie recently began adding to her masks locks of colorful yarn that are tediously stitched into a skull-cap of sorts that slips over the wearers head. Diana brought with her this year to the mask market some fanciful animal masks adorned with papier-mache horns made from recycled grocery bags. “I’m from Oregon, after all,” she says laughing.  In addition to making masks, Diane also teaches a number of workshops to pass on her craft to novice mask makers.

Liz Blaz demonstrates how she applies paint to her mask art.
Liz Blaz demonstrates how she applies paint to her mask art.

Liz Blaz, of New Orleans, also teaches workshops in mask making and recently was in Haiti doing exactly that. She’s been invited by the Minister of Culture for the Cayman Islands to come that Carribean country to conduct workshops there as well.  Blaz’ masks are constructed of leather.  Her interest in the craft took her many years ago to Abano Terme, near Padua, Italy, to study the techniques of Commedia dell’Arte mask making.  Her masks are now worn in theatrical productions throughout Europe and North America.

One of the many molds that Liz Blaz uses to shape her leather masks.
One of the many molds that Liz Blaz uses to shape her leather masks.

While visiting with her at the Mask Market, she explained how she first sculpts her masks using molds, then once she is satisfied with shape and it has dried, she begins to apply layers of paint until it feels it is finished. Some, such as the “mother of pearl” finish, takes many layers of paint blended together to give it the look she’s after.  According to her website, Blaz is working to create a Guild of Maskmakers, to promote and help perpetuate the art.

Scott Schoonover studied his craft in Bali.
Scott Schoonover studied his craft in Bali.

Like Blaz, Scott Schoonover, also traveled abroad to study his craft. Schoonover attended the University of Iowa where he studied set design and became interested in costume making. But it was mask making that intrigued him.

Schoonover's mask designs draw from his experiences in Bali.
Schoonover’s mask designs draw from his experiences in Bali.

He was drawn to Bali, where he learned from native maskmakers.  As Schoonover tells it, part of requirement was to also learn the dances for which each mask was intended. Schoonover says that experience led him to his own philosophy towards his craft which is that “we are a community of artists who tell stories essential to our identity based on a legacy handed down from our ancestors.” He’s now based in St. Louis, where he’s from originally, and sells his work to a number of theatre companies as well as through his website.

Portland, Ore.-based mask maker Tony Fuemmeler stands beside some of his creations on display at the Mardi Gras Mask Market.
Portland, Ore.-based mask maker Tony Fuemmeler stands beside some of his creations on display at the Mardi Gras Mask Market.

Tony Fuemmeler of Portland, Ore., also became interested in mask making while an undergraduate in theatre at the University of Kansas.  There he studied the Lecoq tradition with Ron and Ludvika Popenhagen.  His very stylized masks reflect Lecoq’s development of the neutral mask as a training tool for actors, “designed to facilitate a state of openness in the student-performers, moving gradually on to character and expressive masks, and finally to ‘the smallest mask in the world’ the clown’s red-nose.”*

Tony Fuemeller's masks reflect the Lecoq tradition of maskmaking.
Tony Fuemeller’s masks reflect the Lecoq tradition of maskmaking.

Lecoq’s use of mask changed the performers’ movement on stage. giving them a body-based approach to mask work, rather than a visually led one.  Fuemmeler, who is also a puppeteer and director now teaches workshops for actors that utilize this approach to character development.  You can read more about his work on his website.

Carrie of Washington D.C. tries on one of Wendy Drolma's creations.
Carrie of Washington D.C. tries on one of Wendy Drolma’s creations.

Throughout the weekend, collectors, celebrants and the curious come to New Orleans’ Mardi Gras Mask Market at the French Market to see these wonderful creations.  They are special and unique souvenirs for anyone who ends up purchasing one of them, just as I did at my first mask market. Some of those come seeking new masks for their Mardi Gras costumes, while others, like myself, see their new acquisition as a work of art to be displayed and worn for special occasions. But whether you pick out a mask for purchase, take time to visit this market if you are in New Orleans during Mardi Gras weekend.  It’s an opportunity to see firsthand the work of some premier maskmakers who are continuing a tradition that dates back centuries.

A mask buyer checks out one of Diane Trapp's masks with the papier mache antlers.
A mask buyer checks out one of Diane Trapp’s masks with the papier-mache antlers.

 

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